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Caregiver Tool Kit

The Alzheimer’s Research Association has had a relationship with A Place for Mom for over ten years.

While many will attempt to initially care for their afflicted loved one’s at home, it often becomes apparent that they may need to be moved to a facility that specializes in senior care.

Finding the appropriate facility can be an intimidating prospect, but A Place for Mom is a valuable resource that can help you navigate this process and select the appropriate solution for both the patient and the primary caregiver.

They introduce you to a Senior Specialist that will guide you through the process of considering all aspects of making a selection from over 20,000 senior housing and/or elder care facilities, including financial concerns, level of cognition, local regulations and guidelines and proximity to family and friends. In fact, some are now introducing new units that are dedicated to what is known as “memory care”.

A Place for Mom provides this service at no cost to you.

Below you will find the “Caregiver Toolkit”, a comprehensive resource that was created by A Place for Mom and will answer many of your questions regarding this difficult decision.

The Alzheimer’s Research Association, and “A Place for Mom” has been working together for over 10 years. When we saw this “Caregiver Toolkit” We thought that this would be a valuable resource for the Caregivers that visit our site. “A Place for Mom” has graciously let us use

This Caregiver Toolkit was put together by “A Place for Mom”. A resource that provides solutions for Senior Housing needs.

If you or anyone you know is looking for solutions on Senior Housing, “A Place for Mom” is the ultimate resource for solving those needs; “A Place for Mom”. uses Senior Specialists, that work directly with you to find that special place that you or your loved one can call home.

They do this, by knowing the needs and facilities that your particular area has. They know almost every facility in the country; they also know every situation that seniors face.

They do this all without it costing you anything.

The Alzheimer’s Research Association, and “A Place for Mom” has been working together for over 10 years. When we saw this “Caregiver Toolkit” We thought that this would be a valuable resource for the Caregivers that visit our site. “A Place for Mom” has graciously let us use

The Company provides information regarding more than 20,000[5] senior housing and elder care providers to seniors and their families throughout the United States and Canada through a network of local “senior living advisors”. It also serves as a marketing tool for the thousands of senior housing communities and care providers to which it refers. It is the largest such service in North America.[6] The company also develops and markets customer relationship management (CRM) software for the senior housing industry.[7] In addition, A Place for Mom owns and operates SeniorAdvisor.com, a consumer ratings and reviews site for senior care providers across the U.S. and Canada.

Families have many decisions to make during a senior care search. With so many options available in the U.S., it’s easy to feel confused and overwhelmed. We created this Guide to Senior Housing and care to empower families with current market information so they may act as strong advocates for their aging loved ones. With the right information and resources, you’ll be better prepared to make informed and confident choices for your family.

Assisted living communities provide housing and care to seniors who may need some assistance with daily tasks, but who do not require the skilled care provided at a nursing home. Assistance with medications, activities of daily living, meals and housekeeping are routinely provided. Three meals per day are also served in a central dining room. Residents live in private apartments that frequently have a limited kitchen area (kitchenette). Staff is available 24 hours per day for additional safety. Social activities and scheduled transportation are also available in most communities. A special area for memory care is available in some, but not all communities (see Memory Care).

Each state has its own licensing and regulation requirements for assisted living providers, which can affect the services and care offered. For example, some assisted living communities are able to provide insulin injections while other communities cannot, depending on their licensing and the state the community is located. Another example of varying levels of care is based on ambulation; some states require that all assisted living residents be able to walk, while other states permit residents that need help walking or even need to be lifted.

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